Category Archives: Volume 7

Effect of Adhesives on the Retention of Bordeaux Misture on Arecanut Bunches


Author: M. Anandaraj

Abstract

Bordeaux mixture is a copper compound which is extensively used to prevent fruit rot in arecanut (Areca catechu Linn.) caused by the fungus Phytophthora arecae (Coleman) Pethybridge. It is usually mixed with adhesives to improve its retention.
The quantity of copper retained on areca fruit surface sprayed with 1% Bordeaux mixture added with 0.1% of one of the three adhesives, viz., Triton Navacol and Carboxymethyl cellulose was estimated colorimetrically. No significant difference in copper retention was observed regardless of whether adhesives were added or not.

Keywords : Betel nut (Areca catechu). Bordeaux mixture. Spray adhesives.

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Growth and Fiber Morphology of Abaca (Musa textilis Nee) Ratoons as Influenced by Plant Density and Nitrogen Level


Author: Nestor M. Gloria

Abstract

An old abaca plantation was subjected to butcher harvest as a rejuvena-tion process. The subsequent ratoons were evaluated in terms of growth and fiber dimensions as influenced by plant density and nitrogen level. Replants served as checks in determining the merits of ratooning.
Ratoons emerged approximately 13 days earlier, had more rapid growth and higher dry matter yield of stalk and leaves than the replants. These horticultural characteristics were not significantly affected by plant density and nitrogen fertilizer application after a 12-month period.
Leaf N content significantly increased with increased N fertilizer application during the sixth month but not after 12 months. It was not influenced by plant density.
Fiber cellular dimensions were not affected by the application of 0, 50, 100 and 200 kg N/ha as well as by plant density. However, fiber dimensions of ratoons at any density were bigger than those of replants.

Keywords : Abaca ratoons. Replants. Plant density. Nitrogen level. Growth. Fiber cell dimensions.

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Predictive Configuration of the Knowledge of Farmers about Improved Methods of Cassava Cultivation


Author(s): S. Ramanathan, M. Anantharaman and K.R. Lakshmi

Abstract

Ninety cassava farmers were interviewed to determine the configuration of characteristics which would differentiate the low from the high-knowledge level farmers. Results indicate that farmers with these characteristics in the corresponding variables, i.e. program participation (non-program), age (young), education (low), credit (not availed) and area under cassava (small), most probably possess low knowledge level. Moreover, the aforementioned configuration of characteristics should be used as a criterion in the selection of farmers who will undergo training on improved methods of cassava cultivation. This will greatly help in bridging the knowledge gap and in orienting the cassava training programs toward the need-based target group of farmers.

Keywords : Farmers. Cassava cultivation knowledge. Predictive configuration.

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Effect of Mulch Application and Planting Depth on Growth, Development and Productivity of Upland Taro


Author(s): Jose R. Pardales, Jr

Abstract

Growth, development and harvest attributes of taro were more apparently affected by mulching treatment than by planting depth. Mulched plants exhibited superior height and LAI and markedly higher total and corm dry matter (DM) accumulation than their unmulched counterparts. Most of the harvest characters were significantly greater when taro was mulched than when they were unmulched. The difference between 5 and 10-cm planting depth was negligible for plant height and LAI but was pronounced in the total and corm DM production. Deeper planting significantly favored high DM production at most stages of growth. All harvest characters were significantly increased by planting depth treatments except the main corm volume and total herbage yield.

Keywords : Taro (Colocasia esculenta). Mulch application. Planting depth. Growth. Development. Productivity.

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The Differential Rooting Response of Two Winged Bean [ Psophocarpus tetragonolobus (L.) DC.] Genotypes to IBA Treatments Under Mist


Author(s): R.N. McArdle and J.C. Bouwkamp

Abstract

Sub-terminal stem cuttings of two winged bean genotypes, P1 413214 and PI 413216 were treated with three levels of indolebutyric acid (IBA) and sampled after 15, 17, 19 and 23 days to examine rooting response. IBA treatment dramatically increased root dry weight, root length and root number in PI 413214 over time but had little effect on P1 413216. However, root characters had generally high values and rooting was faster in the latter al all IBA levels. Increases in root dry matter of the untreated cuttings appeared to be linear with time for both genotypes but their corresponding slopes at the three IBA concentrations were highly significantly different.

Keywords : Winged bean. Rooting. Genotype. Indolebutyric acid.

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Effects of Adventitious Root Removal on the Growth of Flooded Tropical Pasture Legumes Macroptilium lathyroides and Vigna luteola


Author: Reynaldo R. Javier

Abstract

Macroptilium lathyroides and Vigna luteola with either intact or removed adventitious roots from the immersed stem, were flooded con-tinuously for 15 and 30 days from the start of flowering.
The removal of adventitious roots from the immersed stem of the flooded plants hastened leaf chlorosis and abscission. Dry matter yield (shoots and roots) and nodule dry weight were reduced to a considerable extent in V. luteola but only to a minor extent in M. lathyroides.
All flooded plants survived with increase in flooding duration. The rapid formation of adventitious roots noted in these species won after immersion provided the adaptive mechanism for plant survival and growth under flooding.

Keywords : Pasture legumes. Flooding. Adventitious root removal. Leaf chlorosis. Abscission. Dry matter yield. Leafdiffusive resistance.

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Effect of Phosphorus and Nitrogen Fertilization and Weed Control Method on Weed Incidence and Mungbean Production


Author: Benjamin C. Agarcio, Jr

Abstract

Optimum mungbean yield was obtained when the crop was fertilized with 30 kg P2O5/ha. Beyond this level, a reduction in yield occurred. The addition of nitrogen fertilizer at the rate of 30 and 60 kg/ha decreased mungbean yield.
Weed count and weed weights increased with increasing rate of nitrogen fertilization. On the other hand, phosphorus fertilization showed no effect on these parameters.
Handweeding resulted in higher yield, but required more labor. Preemergence application of butralin or butachlor followed by handweeding 21 days after seeding gave yields higher than that obtained with single application of either herbicide, indicating the need for supplementary weeding for better control of weeds. Off-barring followed by hilling-up provided some degree of weed control but did not adequately control weeds.

Keywords : Mungbean [Vigna radiata (L.) Wilzeckl. Phosphorus. Nitrogen. Butachlor. Butralin. Weed incidence.

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