Category Archives: Volume 2 No. 1 (1980)

Effect of Bone Meal Supplement on Reproduction of Melengestrol Acetate-Synchronized Native Cattle


Author(s): S. C. Bantugan and J. R. Escano

Abstract

Bone meal supplement slightly improved the reproductive performance of melengestrol acetate (MGA)-synchronized native cattle. Synchronized estrus was higher among cows (80%) and among heifers (90%) in the bone meal supplemented group compared to 80% among cows and 60% among heifers in the control group. The overall breeding effects showed that bone meal supplement had no effect on conception rate among heifers wherein 66.7% conception was recorded on both treatments with 1.7 and 2.0 services per conception in the bone meal supplemented and control group, respectively. Cows showed 62.5% conception with 1.8 services per conception in the bone meal supplemented group compared to 37.5 conception with 2.0 services per conception in the control. No significant differences were observed in all the reproductive parameters investigated.

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Reaction of Golden Yellow Cassava to Meloidogyne spp. Inoculation


Author: R. M. Gapasin

Abstract

The reaction of Golden Yellow cassava differed at varying inoculum levels of Meloidogyne incognita and M. javanica. Initial populations of approximately 10,000 and 20,000 eggs of M. incognita significantly reduced (P = 0.05) the root and top weights of cassava over the control; however, reduction in tuber weight was not significant between all treatments. Although there was a reduction in root, tuber and top weights at varying inoculum levels of M. javanica no significant differences were found between the treatments.

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Morphology of the Sweet Potato Scab Fungus (Sphaceloma batatas Saw.)


Author: Fredeswinda O. Lao

Abstract

Specimens of sweet potato stem and foliage scab were examined microscopically and the causal fungus was cultured in agar media. Two types of conidia were observed, namely: the ovoid or oblong-elliptical designated as macroconidia with an average size of 6.99 x 12u and the minute and spherical referred to as microconidia with an average size of 3.22 x 1.97u. Some microconidia were borne on conidiophores while others lacked well-defined conidiophores whether on host tissues or in culture media. The origin of microconidia was not definitely established in this study. The macroconidia were made to germinate on various liquid media at different time periods. Germination was high in the sweet potato leaf exudate. The conidia enlarged and formed cross walls in 4 hr, formed germ tube and additional septa in 6 hr, branched in 48 hr and as branching became more developed, the hyphae thickened and became constricted in 68 hr.

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Influence of Root-knot Nematode on Bacterial Wilt Severity in Tomato


Author(s): C. M. Napiere and A. J. Quimio

Abstract

Wilt susceptible tomato plants grown in both soils infested with Pseudomonas solanacearum and P. solanacearum – Meloidogyne incognita combination started to die of wilt one week after transplanting; all plants died of wilt one week earlier in the latter than in the former. With resistant cultivars, wilted (dead) plants in soils infested with both the bacterium and the nematode occurred one to four weeks earlier than those plants grown in the bacterium-infested soil alone. Yields of wilt resistant cultivars grown in soils infested with the bacterium-nematode combination were lower (13%) than those plants grown in soils infested with the bacterium alone (23%). None of the plants inoculated or grown in naturally or artificially nematode-infested soil alone died of wilt after the experiment.

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Factors Associated with the Training Performance of Prospective Barangay Development Workers


Author: Ildefonso B. Sadsad

Abstract

Of the seven criteria used by the Department of Local Government and Community Development (DLGCD) for selecting barangay development workers, four were supported by this study while three were not. Supported were preferences for applicants who were younger (21 to 35 years old), had a four-year college degree, had experience related to community development, and had modernizing attitudes. Not supported were preferences for applicants who were males, unmarried, and had a Community Development Officer (CDO) or First Grade Civil Service eligibility. Aside from manifesting traits considered desirable in rural development work, female respondents were found to have performed well as their male counterparts in training. Similarly, respondents who did not possess the CDO or First Grade eligibility were likely to perform well in training as those who possessed these eligibilities. Furthermore, both married and unmarried respondents were found to be equally likely to perform well in training.

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Growth and Yield of Corn lntercropped with Giant Ipil-Ipil on a Hillside


Author(s): J. M. de la Rosa, R. M. Santiago and M. B. Posas

Abstract

Ipil-ipil intercrop significantly enhanced the maturity of corn plants and increased ear length, ear diameter, and grain yield per plant. However, tasseling, plant height, ear height, number of ears per plant, and shelling percentage were not significantly affected. Corn plots intercropped with 10, 15, and 20 ipil-ipil plants per linear meter (T1 , T2 , and T3) gave computed yields of 69.9, 73.4, and 7.0 g/plant, all of which were significantly higher than the control plot (To) ) which yielded 48.5 g/plant. This indicated that grain yield per plant was improved by the intercrop. In terms of total grain yield, however, no marked differences were observed between the intercropped corn and control plots due to the differences in plant population. The smaller and shorter ears obtained in the control plot (To ) were compensated by the number of plants which was twice as many as in T1 , T2, and T3. However, the yields in T2 and Ta exceeded slightly that of To . The average yield obtained was 49.52 cavans or 2.77 t/ha. Hill erosion during heavy rains was greater in To than in T1, T2, and T3.

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Effect of Plant Density on Yield and Yield Components of Sweet


Author(s): J. C. Bouwkamp Ind L. E. Scott

Abstract

Total yield and yields of sweet potatoes measuring 5-9 cm diameter (No. I size) and 2.5-5 cm diameter (No. 2 size) were found to be highest at the closest spacing studied (30 cm between plants, 90 cm between rows) after a full season’s growth (120 days). This effect occurred because as spacing between plants decreased, the number of roots per plant increased but not at an equivalent rate. Thus, when possible, sweet potato growers should practice close spacing and plan to control root size distribution by delaying the harvest date. If this is not feasible (due to various time constraints), root size distribution can be affected by wider spacings. In general, wider spacings (up to 60 cm) will result in any given root size distribution earlier, but with less yield.

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